Fuel Economy Tip – Don’t Get “Sweet” Rims

Today’s tip will help you save money on your gas bill and will keep you from spending hundreds or thousands of dollars on your car’s wheels.

Admire other people’s tricked out tires and rims, but don’t put them on your vehicle.

First, I’d just like to explain that I do have a bias; I think spending money to put “fancy” rims and wide tires on your car is stupid and a waste of money. If you feel the need to waste that amount of money, go ahead and send me a check for $500.

That being said, there is merit behind why you shouldn’t put them on your car.

Your car will get better gas mileage the more “stock” it is, meaning it’s the way the automotive engineers designed it. The more things you add to it, the worse fuel economy it’s going to get.

Additionally, tricked out rims tend to need wider tires which, as you guessed it, reduces your gas mileage. The wider the tire, the more surface that makes contact with the road. That extra surface requires more energy to get up to and maintain speed, meaning more gas used.

Save your money and save your gas.

Comments

  1. Anonymous says:

    A set of centerline forged aluminum rims at around 12-14lbs, will give better performance and fuel economy than any cheap OEM steel wheel or cast aluminium rim (25+ lbs).

    Please educate yourself before spouting off your opinion.

    Just because you enjoy driving a POS, doesnt mean other people shouldnt have fun tweaking – and improving their vehicles both cosmetically, and yes functionally.

  2. hey anon,

    You have to look at inertia as well as weight when looking at wheels.

    Example, take 2 aluminum wheels one is solid and the other is a “ring”. Roll them side by side down a slope.

    The ring rolls slower because it has overall more momentum and therefore take MORE energy to spin.

    Sure the pay off might still be thre or not. but it more complicated than you think.

    It’s just embarrassing for soe to say “Please educate yourself before spouting off your opinion.” then to be uneducated themselves.

  3. geeknip says:

    how do nice “rims” change a POS to a “not POS”?

    Seems to me adding sweet rims to a POS simply make a POS with sweet rims.

  4. Needless to say, I agree with the last two comments. I don’t think that adding rims to my car will take it from being a crappy car to a great one. And, you can’t help but point and laugh at the cars that are worth $500 but have $800 rims.

  5. penty,

    Haven’t you heard of Galileo? Two objects of different mass will nevertheless fall at the same rate. It’s *gravity* that’s working on them. On the moon, a feather will fall no faster and no slower than any other object–one of the astronauts demonstrated this fact.

    So, don’t call others out who tell people to get educated, especially when you missed a basic lesson of seventh-grade physics. I don’t know what your argument is trying to prove.

    The original anonymous is right. Tons of carmakers put cheap steel wheels with plastic covers on their cars. Replacing those wheels with lighter aluminum rims WILL improve your gas mileage.

    Lighter = less energy to get moving = less gas wasted. It’s that simple.

  6. Anonymous says:

    KeplerNiko:

    GALILEO?!

    Wasn’t it Newton with the gravity bit?

    That’s all besides the point, though, because penty’s comment was regarding rolling them down a decline, not dropping them from the same height.

    To be sure, gravity does apply, but just lightening the weight of a rotational mass isn’t going to solve all of your problems.

  7. NONE of you have even contemplated the effects of tire/wheel diameter.

    The larger the diameter, the better the gas milage.

    The reason: increasing the diameter increases the circumfence [ c=2*Pi*(d/2) ], which means that the car travels farther during one revolution of the wheel/tire. This results in the engine turning a lower RPM for a given speed and thus better fuel efficency.

    PS Newton was gravity, or specifcally force=mass*accerlation. Galileo was a mathmetican that dabbled in lots, most famos for his telescopes and celestial observations.

  8. keplerniko: look up moment of inertia. You need a basic rotational dynamics refresher.

    lucas: lower engine RPM does not necessarily mean better fuel economy. Your engine will get its best economy at a particular speed, and it won’t be at 1000 rpm. In my car, it’s around 3000-3500 (at least on the highway, where it’s easiest to make these measurements because I can keep the speed constant). Also: you only get the same acceleration for falling bodies because gravitational force is proportional to mass (according to Newton anyway). Again, in this case, you must consider moment of inertia as well as just mass, since it requires extra energy to get something rotating (in addition to translating).

  9. Anonymous says:

    haha morons, first of all, aftermarket wheels usualy are wider which does increase the contact patch with the road, however the tires that fit these aftermarket wheels are low profile and are usualy inflated to a higher pressure which equates to less deformation of the tire on the road surface which in turn decreases the amount of rolling resistance which in turn increases gas mileage, and to the moron who thinks his car gets the best mileage in the 3000 rpm range, try that in first gear, at cruising speeds in the highest gear, lower RPM is going to give you better mileage unless your engine has a seriously crazy ass backwards powerband, so larger diameter tires and wheels are going to give you slightly better mileage for that fact alone, it is true that some larger wheels and tires have a larger rotational mass than some stocks, but if you buy “lightweight” wheels that most of which are nearly half the weight of normal steel ones, youre going to save on rotational mass even though the diameter is a few inches larger. take it from someone who has driven many junkers with nice wheels :) i have a dodge spirit POS now and i averaged 24mpg highway on my stock wheels and tires, just recently ive purchased a set of 16 inch lightweight rims and new tires, i havnt officialy recorded the mileage but a difference is obvious even wihtout the numbers, i’d guess its somewhere around 28 now. so everyone stop arguing, quit throwing around theories that have nothing to do with the physics of ..er…wheels..

  10. Looks like this tip has been debunked.

    Maybe I’ll have to retract my statement and post a tip that you SHOULD get lighter rims. Just don’t get those freaking spinning rims that make you look like a donkey.

  11. Anonymous says:

    Ok, setting some things straight:

    Your car has a best fuel efficiency ratio at a certain moment in the powerband. Unless you have a sportscar, it’s most probably somewhere in the 2000-5000 RPM range. Of course, it’s not all over the powerband. My car (A 2.0L, 115bhp engine) has it’s peak efficiency at 2500 RPM. Some cars (especially cars with less power), might have the peak efficiency at 4500 or somewhere around. This number is selected by the engineers when designing the car.

    Of course, going at your peak efficiency in RPM in 1st is less efficient than going at peak power (about 1-15% of the RPM range below the redline) in 5th. Trying to compare these two conditions is stupid.

    Second, increasing wheel diameter usually won’t give you better or worse mileage, since the total output of energy is the same. What it will do is change the speeds at which you’ll have the most efficiency. If your top efficiency is at, say, 60mph in 4th, then increasing your wheel diameter might change that number to 70mph. If you usually drive at 70, then yes, it will have better efficiency at the expense of worse efficiency when you’re not driving at that speed.

    Finally, bigger wheels require more energy to turn. Inertia (which is the resistance of the wheels to roll) is the mass times the square of the distance between the mass and the axis. So, if you reduce the weight in half, but increase the radius to twice the size, you’ll have twice as much inertia in the wheels.

    Oh, and Galileo has nothing to do with this discussion. The only moment where Galileo’s gravity principle is when you’re going up or down cliffs, where you have to add or substract the energy used to raise or lower the car’s altitude to the energy consumed. Still, 40lb in a 3000lb car is completely negligible.

    Basic mechanics, folks. Basic mechanics.

  12. The first comment left is absolutely correct. HOWEVER — I think the point being made was to not buy the “bling bling” rims that probably weigh 40-50 pounds a piece and are obviously too big for the car. You know, the guys that put 20″ rims on a Dodge Neon with tires so wide they stick out 2″ from the car.

    I took the lighter rims route on my car. I dropped 14 pounds per wheel while maintaining the stock tire width and height. It made a difference of 2mpg, which in my 25k+ miles per year case is a pretty big savings over the course of a year.

  13. I was all set to “corrent” KeplerNiko but some already did.

    “Gravity” and “moment of inertia” are 2 differnet things.

    Your good eveidce that a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing.

  14. Anonymous says:

    How about just stop driving? Or selling whatever it is that you’re driving that gets less than 30 mpg? Or taking public transportation? Or riding a bike?

    Cars are not as necessary as many people think they are. They are mostly a luxury.

    Sure, getting extravagant rims on a low-quality car is silly. However, to a certain extent, so is relying on your automobile so much! If you want to bling up your ride but don’t want to pay any more in gas prices, don’t drive the thing one day a week.

    ~

  15. Anonymous 2 says:

    Wow I have really got a good kick out of this artical.

    There are more than a few factors at play; first of all if you have more contact with the road you are going to have more resistance regardless of how you try to justify it, however I highly doubt it will affect your economy drastically because by using a wider tire you are also displacing the weight of the vehical over more area which means your contact with the road has less weight per square inch on it (thus slightly less ristance; same reason why people put weight in the back of trucks when it snows). Secondly, your vehical (this is espeically true with newer vehicals which have numerous sensors that will adjust your fuel delivery based) is designed for an optimum diameter which you should try to maintain by using lower profile tires on larger diameter rims. Just ask anybody who has huge oversized tires on thier 4×4 (and has not adjusted axel or gear ratios) what they get for gas miliage. Finally weight is a MAJOR factor, once a wheel is spinning at a consistant ratio it does not require a lot of energy to continue spinning (yes this would be because the inertia of the wheel is present). However both starting and stopping a heavier wheel requires more energy.. go ahead and strap on a bunch of lead weights to your bicyle wheel and then try to climb a hill.

    I guess the final point I wanted to make was that you can achive much better gas milage by using a lighter & slightly larger rim (less tire weight for low profile tires), but another thing to consider is that by increasing your contact size with the road is going to give you a safety advantage as well by decreasing your stopping distance and giving you better all around handeling.

    Hopefully this puts an end to this artical… unless I have make a spelling “misteak” somewhere that enevatibly some jackass will use to discredit me :)

    Drive safe folks,

  16. no one says:

    id like to start off by saying bigger rims as in diameter actually in crease ur over all gas mileage on the highway but it does reduce ur gas mileage in the city. so sorry u only have half the storry right and if u drive on the highway more often than in the city the investment of bigger sweeter looking rims could actually pay off.

  17. Hey,

    I just stumbled onto this blog….wow…1st of all anon 2 you wrote, “I love this artical”??..huh….yo how bout an english class…its article which is what you should learn to spell if you want to blog for the public to see and read. Anyways as far as the POS issue….your best bet is to just drive a POS or those 20′s or 18′s or whatever you flossin’….those gonna get ripped off in da hood…come out car be on jacks n stuff…know what I’m sayin cuz?

  18. Anonymous says:

    Stevo you are so ignorant, you should read the whole article because he said, “unless I have make a spelling

  19. BEATRICE says:

    SIMPLE. YOU WANT A BETTER LOOK FOR YOUR CAR AND BETTER HANDLING? GET HIGH PERFORMANCE WHEELS OR RACE WHEELS OR WHATEVER YOU WANT TO CALL IT. THEY ARE DESIGNED TO BE LIGHT AND TO LAST AND NOT CRACK. THEY MIGHT BE A LITTLE MORE BUT REMEMBER YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR. PERFORMANCE WHEELS ARE LIGHT. IF YOU ARE CONCERNED ABOUT GAS MILEAGE DONT GET ANYTHING HEAVY OR ANYTHING LIKE THOSE SPINNER THINGS.

  20. A few people actually have it right, light wheels create less rolling inertia than heavy wheels so you will get better gas mileage. So if you replace your stock 16 in steel rims with 20 inch aluminum rims generally you will get better gas mileage. If you replace your 16 inch steel rims with 20inch steel rims you will get worse gas mileage. A wheel is like a donugut, most of the wight is far from the center of the wheel. If the wheel weighs 20 lbs and you move that weight 4 inches further from the center of the wheel it will take more energy to move it and you will get worse gas mileage. On the other had when you replace that 16 inch steel with a lighter 20″ aluminum, generally you will get better gas mileage because even though most of the wheels weight is farthur from the axle, you are moving less weight and the tire has a lower moment of inertia. You would get the best gas milage by replacing your 16in steel rims with 16 inch aluminum rims.
    The posters who talk about larger diameter wheels increasing the size of how far you travel on one rotation are a little off. When you increase rim size you decrease the rubber ‘thickness’ so the overall diameter of the rim and tire is about the same whether you have 16 inch rims or 20 inch rims.
    Personally I added 20in aluminum rims to my Tahoe because I liked the looks. Three weeks latter I took them back because since I had to have lower profile tires to keep the overall diameter the same, the ride sucked. There wasn’t enough tire to soak up the roughness of the road and the Tahoe’s springs and suspension weren’t designed for it. Performance (handling) was better with a lower profile, wider tire. But, ride quality suffered. I have a SAAB that I added lighter weight bigger aluminum wheel and I ended up with better handling and better milage since the SAAB’s suspention could handle the rougher ride.

  21. Pathetic. Whatever the argument, the insults just reek of “Im better than you”. People who drive a 70k+ car can get spinny rims..they are showing off and thats ok. People who drive a 88 honds civic and put spinny rims on it are the ones that kill those of us who care about our lives. They need to have thier car taken off of them and deported back to mexico, the ghetto, or wherever they are from because it certainly isnt anywhere where education is prevelant.

  22. Anonymous 24 says:

    Well thanks guys for the advice even if you still argue ,i just have a simple question atm i am using a hyundai accent 2004 with dohc engine 1.6 it have 14 inch wheel 185\60 i was just wondering can i change it into 15inch 195\55
    i dont think its sport car but am just looking for more stablity & handling & same fuel consuption without affecting the adometter or the suspention
    because when i added a 16 inch wheel 205\45 the car wasnt stable even the steering wheel was shaking so bad

  23. Anon 24, the right size you should “Plus size” to is 195/50 R15, if the original size is 185/60 R14. Check a site like TireRack.com, they explain how to adjust tire size when upgrading wheel size so the new wheel/tire combo fit without throwing off your speedometer readings.

    On the whole weight issue, you just can’t take it to an extreme:

    16 inch steel wheel weighs more than a 16 inch forged alloy wheel.

    16 inch steel wheel weighs the same or LESS than a chrome-plated wheel, b/c the plating makes an alloy wheel heavier.

    16 in steel wheel weighs LESS than a 22″ chromed-out spinning set of Dubs, b/c of the aforementioned chrome, plus the additional spinning hardware.

    Even in light alloy wheels, if you go to an extremely large size, you’re dramatically increasing the weight of the wheel, which cancels out the weight benefits. Again, check out tirerack.com or discounttire.com and look at the weights of wheels rise by about 2-4 lbs. PER SIZE.

    Now for the TIRES: usually when you get big rims they’re accompanied by high-performance tires that are biased towards tons of grip, not low rolling resistance…aka lower MPG.

    The trick is to buy a lightweight alloy wheel, match it with a low-rolling-resistance tire and if you’re going to get a larger wheel, go up no more than 2-3 sizes (ride comfort will get shot beyond that anyway).

    If you look at Honda, up until recently their high-performance versions of cars did not have big wheels…even their high-end NSX sports car had 17s (and I believe 18s in their last 2 model years), b/c you reach a point where big wheels become a heavy burden & increase unsprung weight (look it up), no matter of what alloy it’s made out of.

    I’m not a follower of Newton or Galileo or Socrates or Einstein or whomever; I’ve just had the experience of putting heavy chrome wheels on my own car as well as others back in my heyday. The big wheels increased grip tremendously, at the expense of steering feel (much more numb) and MPG.

    Now that I’m older (and hopefully a bit wiser), I only upgrade 1 or 2 sizes up, and look for the lightest decent-looking wheel possible (not flashy!) and match it to an all-season low-roll resistance tire.

  24. Ligher tires are eaiser to accelerate thus good for driving with frequent stops and speeds changes.

    Heavier tires are easier to maintain at a constant speed. Thus good for highway milage, or for driving that doesn’t stop or change speeds often.

    RMP at 1,000 takes more gas than RMP at 10,000

    To a practial point, the less contact area the more efficient.

    Forget Newton or Gali the ideas you all are thowing around are way beyond basic physics. Various cars will have a nonlinear reaction to changes in their drivetrain.

  25. Daniel Johnson says:

    Don’t know if this has been mentioned, but your car will get the best mpg when the motor is running at the peak of it’s torque output. For my car that is right around 3000 rpm. This is not to say, that 5th gear at 1000 rpm is better than 3rd gear at 3000, but that once you pass your peak torque in any given gear your mileage will start to drop.

    Circumference plays a part in the mileage factor, but is often offset in that it pushes the weight that needs to be spun further from the axle, so usually you don’t see a gain or loss from that.

    The best is to have a light wheel that has as much weight as it can towards the center. The closer the weight is to the axle, the easier it will spin.

  26. chemicalgutter says:

    speed at which the car will be most fuel-efficient. In some cases this can help or hinder your fuel economy depending on driving style. I thought it was interesting that many of the people writing in this page assumed that putting larger diameter rims on your car will increase your ride height and distance traveled per tire revolution. Obviously you have to put a different tire size on the car and there are space limitations as to what size tire you use (rubbing issues with fender wells).

    Correction: automakers don’t always design their cars with max. fuel economy as the paramount goal. They design them for sales and sometimes reliability and customer satisfaction because it is in their best interest. In most cases modifications can be made to increase fuel efficiency these are not part of the original design because of beliefs that installing the mods on the cars from the factory would produce no increase in profits.

    As for decreasing wheel weight I think one person got it right by saying that decreasing moment of inertia without changing overall tire diameter or width will increase fuel efficiency.

    If you are changing the overall tire height this will change the effective gearing of the car (taller tire will facilitate higher speeds per rpm). But gas mileage is not as simple as relating rpms to fuel efficiency. Powerbands and “fuel efficient bands” are almost never the same. The overall fuel efficiency at different speeds is based mainly on two independent characteristics: engine fuel efficiency characteristics and the nonlinear increase in drag with relation to speed (nobody has said a word about drag on this forum – I am talking about drag on the vehicle, not air resistance on the tires… obviously increasing the width of the tire increases air resistance and thereby decreases fuel efficiency)

    Here is a quote from Wikipedia that I found useful. “Note that the power needed to push an object through a fluid increases as the cube of the velocity. A car cruising on a highway at 50 mph (80 km/h) may require only 10 horsepower (7.5 kW) to overcome air drag, but that same car at 100 mph (160 km/h) requires 80 hp (60 kW). ”

    So lets say that lab testing shows that your car produces the most power at the wheel per gallon of fuel used in fifth gear at 2800 rpms and this translates to 65 mph. 65 mph is most likely not your most efficient speed to travel in a real environment with air drag. Final fuel efficiency estimates at various speeds can only be found by road testing or by coupling the results of the previous test with wind tunnel testing. For instance if this car exhibits similar power efficiency (maybe slightly lower) at a lower speed, say 45mph, it will be more efficient at a lower speed than 65 mph because of the huge effects that drag has on fuel economy.
    See Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fuel_economy_vs_speed_1997.png

    Changing tire height can sometimes help fuel economy if it causes the car to exist more often in the fuel-efficient zone. If you are consistently driving at high speeds (65mph +) a taller tire will most likely give you better fuel economy. However this will not be accurately realized unless your odometer is adjusted or you do calcs to correct for tire height. And this mod will not always be fuel efficient depending on the increase in drag encountered by changing ride height.

    The only fuel economy increasing methods that I can think of which are always successful on any vehicle are as follows:
    1. Decrease moment of inertia of the rotating wheel
    2. Decrease drag on the car …ie. Make more aerodynamic
    3. Decrease the weight of the car
    4. Installing an accurate fuel economy gauge which displays instantaneous fuel edonomy… assuming that this causes you to be more aware of when you are being fuel efficient… Research Hypermiling: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypermiling

    Note: Making mods to the cars engine can also help sometimes with fuel economy.

    Your best bet is to do your research on your car and find stories of people who have tried exactly what you are doing on your particular car… unless of course you own a test lab or have an endless supply of money to try mods out and do appropriate road testing.

  27. chemicalgutter says:

    Sorry about that last post… I didn’t paste it appropriately into the text box.

    Bear with me here I have a few things to add and some corrections for a few of the uninformed individuals.

    It amazed me that no one considered the effects that varying your overall tire height has on your efficiency. If no re-gearing is done it is quite possible that you have changed the speed at which the car will be most fuel-efficient. In some cases this can help or hinder your fuel economy depending on driving style. I thought it was interesting that many of the people writing in this page assumed that putting larger diameter rims on your car will increase your ride height and distance traveled per tire revolution. Obviously you have to put a different tire size on the car and there are space limitations as to what size tire you use (rubbing issues with fender wells).

    Correction: automakers don’t always design their cars with max. fuel economy as the paramount goal. They design them for sales and sometimes reliability and customer satisfaction because it is in their best interest. In most cases modifications can be made to increase fuel efficiency these are not part of the original design because of beliefs that installing the mods on the cars from the factory would produce no increase in profits.

    As for decreasing wheel weight I think one person got it right by saying that decreasing moment of inertia without changing overall tire diameter or width will increase fuel efficiency.

    If you are changing the overall tire height this will change the effective gearing of the car (taller tire will facilitate higher speeds per rpm). But gas mileage is not as simple as relating rpms to fuel efficiency. Powerbands and “fuel efficient bands” are almost never the same. The overall fuel efficiency at different speeds is based mainly on two independent characteristics: engine fuel efficiency characteristics and the nonlinear increase in drag with relation to speed (nobody has said a word about drag on this forum – I am talking about drag on the vehicle, not air resistance on the tires… obviously increasing the width of the tire increases air resistance and thereby decreases fuel efficiency)

    Here is a quote from Wikipedia that I found useful. “Note that the power needed to push an object through a fluid increases as the cube of the velocity. A car cruising on a highway at 50 mph (80 km/h) may require only 10 horsepower (7.5 kW) to overcome air drag, but that same car at 100 mph (160 km/h) requires 80 hp (60 kW). ”

    So lets say that lab testing shows that your car produces the most power at the wheel per gallon of fuel used in fifth gear at 2800 rpms and this translates to 65 mph. 65 mph is most likely not your most efficient speed to travel in a real environment with air drag. Final fuel efficiency estimates at various speeds can only be found by road testing or by coupling the results of the previous test with wind tunnel testing. For instance if this car exhibits similar power efficiency (maybe slightly lower) at a lower speed, say 45mph, it will be more efficient at a lower speed than 65 mph because of the huge effects that drag has on fuel economy.
    See Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fuel_economy_vs_speed_1997.png

    Changing tire height can sometimes help fuel economy if it causes the car to exist more often in the fuel-efficient zone. If you are consistently driving at high speeds (65mph +) a taller tire will most likely give you better fuel economy. However this will not be accurately realized unless your odometer is adjusted or you do calcs to correct for tire height. And this mod will not always be fuel efficient depending on the increase in drag encountered by changing ride height.

    The only fuel economy increasing methods that I can think of which are always successful on any vehicle are as follows:
    1. Decrease moment of inertia of the rotating wheel (w/o changing the tire height)
    2. Decrease drag on the car …ie. Make more aerodynamic
    3. Decrease the weight of the car
    4. Installing an accurate fuel economy gauge which displays instantaneous fuel edonomy… assuming that this causes you to be more aware of when you are being fuel efficient… Research Hypermiling: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypermiling

    Note: Making mods to the cars engine can also help sometimes with fuel economy.

    Your best bet is to do your research on your car and find stories of people who have tried exactly what you are doing on your particular car… unless of course you own a test lab or have an endless supply of money to try mods out and do appropriate road testing.

  28. william says:

    Just to add to the real word data. My 2003 WRX got an average of 23mpg during a full two years of carefully tracked mileage on 16×7 Version 5 STi alloys. I switched to 17×7.5 Version 7 STi alloys. The larger wheels had lower profile tires with an overall diameter only 1/10 on an inch larger then the smaller wheels which is small enough to negate the overall diameter difference matter. The larger and smaller tires were the same model of yokohama tire which should negate any difference in rolling resistance due to different tire compounds. The only appreciable difference is the fact that the larger Version 7 rims had a wider rim, and it was farther from the center of rotation. This increased the total rotating mass, and moved that mass farther from the center of rotation for each wheel. I’m not saying any individual post is right or wrong here, but my as described wheel change resulted in a drop from 23 mpg to 19 mpg averaged over two years before and one year after the swap to larger wheels. This was noted driving the same commute with no other mods made to the car and no changes in the brand or point of purchase of the fuel. I’m not trying to explain it, but there are my real world results.

  29. I have aftermarket wheels on my 2004 porsche cayenne, 20″ black painted tsw rims. The stock wheels that came on it when i bought it used were 16 inch wheels, with all season tires, i averaged about 14 mpg city driving. I changed out the wheels for TSW 20″ black rims. after about 200 miles or so, the computer was saying 12.9 mpg, so that’s a 1.1 decrease in miles per gallon. It might be the way I drive, or just the rim size, but it definitively went down. It handles like a dream though, the wider size keeps it on the road like glue when its raining.

  30. Well, I was gonna post just to say your piece is not quite accurate and the issue isnt so cut and dry, but many beat me to it.
    However like some have stated, there are plenty of light weight larger rims, also wider tires, when used properly on a car (ie not putting 245′s on a stock 89 civic) they can give a safety advantage.

  31. To the person (CHRIS) who wrote: “People who drive a 88 honds civic and put spinny rims on it are the ones that kill those of us who care about our lives. They need to have thier car taken off of them and deported back to mexico, the ghetto, or wherever they are from because it certainly isnt anywhere where education is prevelant”, CHRIS.

    People have a choice about how they choose to make adjustments to their vehicles. Stating that the people who drives cars with after market parts resides where education is prevelant, is foolish. I have two degrees, and currently working in the legal field. I drive a Impala with with 22 inch rims, and I also drive a Mercedes S430 with 20 inch rims. I have a relative that has a new model Mercedes S550 that is a business owner. We both reside in premier neighborhoods, not the ghettos. PLEASE STOP stereotyping people by the cars we drive. Eventually the police will too, someday…

  32. So true…..My dad bought me “sweet rims” back in 06′ every week I was putting gas. I decided to put my stock tires back on 2 weeks ago, I filled up my gas tank (2004 nissan sentra 1.8 engine) & I still have quarter of tank left :))

  33. It’s been my general experience that the smaller rims get better gas mileage. I base this not so much on science as I do on experience. My most notable experience was with a Yukon Denali that we had purchased from used. The previous owner had put 22″ rims on there. Not being a huge fan of the low-pro’s we decided to go with the factory recommended 17″s. The difference was night and day. With the 22′s we were averaging around 13-14 m.p.g. With 17′s it’s been a consistent 16-17.

    On a side note, Dallas, calling people out for stuff that is statistically true isn’t profiling if it’s accurate. Let me sum it up and just TRY to give me a logical rebuttal. All of this is based, again, off experience.
    1. Black people will put spinning rims on anything. Anything. If they made spinning rims for t.v.’s black people would buy them like hotcakes.
    2. Hispanics will put low profile tires and hydraulics on anything that moves. Especially funny when you see an old beat up old’s that’s probably worth fifty bucks at most sporting a hydraulic package and low pros that probably cost about 2-3k.
    3. Asians love the pimped out subcompacts. Prove me wrong.
    4. Just in case you think I forgot I’ll point out the white’s addiction. We will put loud ass subs in the biggest pieces of crap that you can imagine. If we could put sub on our 10 speed bikes we would.

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